Malaga’s Urban Street Art

Malaga’s Urban Street Art

Whilst researching ‘things to see & do” in Malaga before our recent trip there, I stumbled across the MAUS (Malaga Arte Urbano SoHo) project and added it as a definite must visit when we got there. I am so glad I did, as it was well worth the half day we spent wandering around SoHo other wise known as the Barrio de las Artes (Art neighborhood).

Historically a very affluent neighborhood, which had gone into decline over the past fifty years, is in the process of being re-energised through cultural events and urban street art.

We began our visit and self guided walking tour at the CAC (the Centre for Contemporary Art), which like all of the high impacting street art is completely free. The CNC itself is worth visiting alone, so I will leave discussing it until a later blog post.

The MAUS project originated in 2013 when international street artists were invited to the SoHo neighborhood to create large scale signature pieces. For more about the actual project click here for their website.

I filmed our walking tour as we meandered, starting from the side of the CNC building by the river Guadalmedina. Part of the riverbed was actually dry and hosted a variety of urban street art pieces along the bridge and sides. Looking out towards the Mediterranean, the first large scale street art pieces by OBEYand D*FACE are an impressive sight. (Image in the top banner)

From there we literally wandered up and down streets, taking our time and soaking up the atmosphere, buildings were being gutted and renovated, locals busied themselves with daily chores, tourists either hurried by ticking boxes of items ‘to see’ or sat enjoying tapas and drinks, others meandered like us.

All united in a large urban scale art gallery where art and life meet like old friends passing in the street or as new acquaintances, spending brief moments together never destined to become friends only fond memories.

Follow our meandering walk through of one of the most impressive urban landscape galleries I have visited and if you do find yourself in Malaga with a half a day to spare I highly recommend taking the trip yourself.

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Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

A few weeks ago my hubby and I spent a week in Málaga, the sun was much needed after our pretty wet and gloomy Irish summer.

But enough of that, I was pretty excited as I had just been given a pressie of a new iPhone SE and Gimble (basically a steadicam for the iPhone) from Alan AKA the hubby. I have pretty much spent the whole bleak summer shooting all kinds of shakyish footage on my iPhone 5 and I definitely needed an upgrade. So getting to try out the new toys (will do a detailed blog post about them very soon), and being on holiday meant that I shot an absolute bucket load of footage in Málaga. Most of it is yet to be edited, but I am getting there.

The first piece of footage I’ve finished is one from our many visits to the wonderfully atmospheric Central Market right is the heart of Málaga. Once we were settled in our AirBnB apartment it was the first place on our agenda to visit, that is of course after walking by the beach to get to it.

 

The Market is situated at Calle Atarazanas, 10, 29005 in Málaga. The Moorish Arched entrance at the front of the market actually dates back to the 14th Century and was originally a shipyard, where believe or not the Mediterranean Sea actually used to come right up to its entrance. The name Atarazanas translates to ‘shipyard’ a nod towards its origins.

Subsequently after the expulsion of the Moors from Andalucía by Isabelle and Ferdinand it was used for a variety of purposes from a convent, where it is told that the nuns found the sound of the sea too distracting and left, to a military arsenal, hospital and medical school.

It was eventually knocked down and rebuilt into what it is today between 1876 and 1879. Designed by Joaquín de Rucoba who is also responsible for Parque de Málaga and Plaza de toros de La Malagueta both of which will have their own dedicated posts shortly.

Rucoba rebuilt the market incorporating the last standing Moorish horseshoe arch and combined it with the chosen building material of the day Iron to create a large market space broken into three sections for fish, meat and fruit/veg, and that is pretty much what you will see today.

Recently the market has had a refurbishment with the addition of an impressively large stained glass window depicting the history of the city.

If you are at all a foodie the market is a must visit for atmosphere, great food, a chance to practice your Spanish, which is what we did, and as with all markets they are the perfect opportunity to mix with locals and tours alike.

The short video accompanying this post shows a walk through of the market starting from the horseshoe arch at the front, through mostly the fruit and veg section, mainly because we’re vegetarians, and on to the stained glass window on the opposite side.

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Mercado Central Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

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